Guy Carleton, Lord Dorchester, Document Signed giving an account of money that is owed from October 25th to December 14th 1793.
Guy Carleton, Lord Dorchester, Document Signed giving an account of money that is owed from October 25th to December 14th 1793.
Guy Carleton, Lord Dorchester, Document Signed giving an account of money that is owed from October 25th to December 14th 1793.

Guy Carleton, Lord Dorchester, Document Signed giving an account of money that is owed from October 25th to December 14th 1793.

Date Published: 1793
Binding: No binding

4 pages, 8 x 12-1/4 inch and 1 page affixed to page three, of detailed accounts, dated, Quebec, October 28, 1793, giving an account of money that is owed from October 25th to December 14th 1793.

Moderate soiling with tattered edges professionally repaired and minor browning, otherwise in very good condition. Exlibrary small stamp (W.C Putnam collection Davenport Public Museum) on p2, p4 and mounted insert page on p3. Sir Guy Carleton served in America beginning in 1758. He was governor of Quebec and commander of British forces in Canada (1775-77), during which time he repelled Montgomery and Benedict Arnold’s attack on Quebec, defeated Arnold on Lake Champlain and re-took Crown Point. From 1782-83 he was Commander in Chief in Canada. General in 1793.

William Clement Putnam was born on June 26, 1862, in Davenport, Iowa, the city in which he spent his entire life. He was a voracious reader whose love of history was piqued early. At a young age, he began to collect pieces of local history, once commenting, "I have always had a great passion for old papers and autographs..." With his four brothers, he founded a historical society at the family's home of Woodlawn. He graduated from high school in 1880 with ambitions of becoming a lawyer, joining his father's law office for a time before heading off to law school at the University of Iowa. He returned to Davenport after graduation in 1883 and rejoined his father's firm as a partner in Putnam & Putnam. Business led him occasionally to New York City where he developed a deeper appreciation for art and literature. Now, with a steady income, he was better able to purchase the artifacts of history that he loved so well, amassing an amazing library of historical items, books of literature and science, art, music, and architecture. Tragically, W. C. became seriously ill (the first illness of any consequence in his life) and died within a few days, on January 13, 1906. He was not yet forty-four. Following his death, his collection was donated to the Davenport Academy of Sciences. quoted from Auction house write-up where this item was purchased.
Very Good. Item #4593

$900.00 USD
$1,208.26 CAD

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