The Flying Ace promotional brochure or pressbook on early African American cinema from Norman Studios film studio. Richard Edward NORMAN, Kathryn BOYD, Laurence CRINER.
The Flying Ace promotional brochure or pressbook on early African American cinema from Norman Studios film studio
The Flying Ace promotional brochure or pressbook on early African American cinema from Norman Studios film studio
The Flying Ace promotional brochure or pressbook on early African American cinema from Norman Studios film studio
The Flying Ace promotional brochure or pressbook on early African American cinema from Norman Studios film studio
The Flying Ace promotional brochure or pressbook on early African American cinema from Norman Studios film studio
The Flying Ace promotional brochure or pressbook on early African American cinema from Norman Studios film studio
The Flying Ace promotional brochure or pressbook on early African American cinema from Norman Studios film studio

The Flying Ace promotional brochure or pressbook on early African American cinema from Norman Studios film studio

Place Published: Florida
Publisher: The Norman Film Studios
Date Published: 1926
Edition: 1st Edition
Binding: No binding

First edition. Was a four-page, now flat, Norman Studios bright graphics film poster promotional brochure, or pressbook for the movie called "The Flying Acel" with an all colored cast. Size: 14-1/2 x 18-1/2 inches flat. 3 colours one size (yellow, red & black) and 1 colour verso black. This 1922 movie featured famed rodeo cowboy Bill Pickett, along with accomplished actors Lawrence Chenault, Anita Bush and Steve “Peg” Reynolds. Promotional brochure meant for mailing was folded, now flat. Very good+ condition.

Released in 1926, starring Lawrence Criner and Kathryn Boyd, two established Black actors, this film was a major hit for Norman Studios. Criner played a World War I fighter pilot who returns home a hero. Peg Reynolds was Criner's side kick and together they rescue Boyd and her father from railroad thieves. The film boasted death defying feats in "the greatest airplane thriller ever filmed," but in reality, Norman shot all the airplane scenes with the plane on the ground. Though billed as “the greatest airplane thriller ever filmed,” the dueling planes in The Flying Ace actually were just a single plane shot from different angles. Among the top crowd-pleasing scenes was one in which the villain’s plane, with the kidnapped heroine in the back seat, flips upside down. Even so, the film was a sensation and grossed close to $20,000 through Norman's distribution efforts. According to World War II historians, many of the young boys who would grow up to become the Tuskegee Airmen were inspired to fly by seeing The Flying Ace.
Very Good+. Item #8599

$350.00 USD
$432.09 CAD