Charles de Montmorency, Duke of Damville signed document. Charles de Montmorency MONTMORENCY, Duke of Damville.
Charles de Montmorency, Duke of Damville signed document
Charles de Montmorency, Duke of Damville signed document
Charles de Montmorency, Duke of Damville signed document
Charles de Montmorency, Duke of Damville signed document
Charles de Montmorency, Duke of Damville signed document
Charles de Montmorency, Duke of Damville signed document
Charles de Montmorency, Duke of Damville signed document

Charles de Montmorency, Duke of Damville signed document

Place Published: Paris
Publisher: Charles de Montmorency,
Date Published: 1608
Edition: 1st Edition
Binding: No binding

Charles de Montmorency, Duke of Damville (1537-1612). Document on vellum, Paris, 27 August 1608, 37 × 52 cm, 18 lines of text in a secretarial hand signed by Montmorency, folds, 4 holes affecting several lines, small split on the bottom right, otherwise good condition.

Brevet de capitaine garde des côtes de la Saâne, Quiberville et ses dépendances [environs de Dieppe], accordé par l’amiral de France, Charles de Montmorency-Damville, à Aymar de Manneville (1552/1617), capitaine de 50 hommes d’armes, qui fut bailli et gouverneur de Gisors. Il l’invite à user de la force en cas de nécessité en particulier pour lutter « contre toutes descentes, incursions d’ennemys ou de pyrates… ». / Certificate of captain guard of the coast of the Saâne, Quiberville and its dependencies [near Dieppe], granted by the admiral of France, Charles de Montmorency-Damville, to Aymar de Manneville (1552-1617), captain of 50 men of arms, who was bailiff and governor of Gisors. Montmorency invites de Manneville to use force in case of necessity, in particular to fight "against all raids, incursions by enemies or pirates".

Charles de Montmorency (1537-1612) was a French nobleman, Baron, later Duke of Damville. In the second part of the sixteenth century, Paris was largely dominated by what became known as the French Wars of Religion (1562–1598). Montmorency’s father was the head of the Catholic army against the Huguenots. Montmorency fought in these wars, which concluded with the Edict of Nantes and the reaffirmation of Catholicism as the official state religion with a significant degree of religious and political freedom to Protestants. In 1588, Montmorency returned to Paris, fought in the Battles of Arques and Caron, and in 1596 was appointed Admiral of France and Brittany. Montmorency was a chief supporter of Samuel de Champlain (ca. 1570-1635), the geographer and explorer whose mission was to establish a joint French and Native American agricultural and fur-trading colony in New France (Quebec). Champlain’s account of his first voyage to New France is entitled Des savvages ov Voyage de Samvel Champlain, De Brovage, fait en la France Nouuelle, l'an mil six cens trois (1603). It has a dedication to Montmorency. In 1608, the same year as the date as Montmorency’s certificate, Champlain founded the trading post that became Quebec City. Montmorency died in 1612, having never set foot in in the New World. A year after his death, Champlain named the Montmorency Falls and River in his honour. In July 1759, during the campaign to take all French possessions in Canada, British forces landed near the base of the waterfall and established a fortified camp on the heights to the east. The ensuing Battle of Montmorency (31 July 1759) saw the British, under General James Wolfe, repulsed and forced to evacuate their positions by French forces sent from Quebec City. Montmorency is also commemorated in the Montmorency Manoir, built in 1781 by Frederick Haldimand, governor general in chief of Canada, the county and town of Montmorency in Quebec, and Collège Montmorency.

Collection on consignment with LDRB.
Good. Item #8468

$1,200.00 USD
$1,509.08 CAD