21 American Women Poets’ collection.
21 American Women Poets’ collection
21 American Women Poets’ collection
21 American Women Poets’ collection
21 American Women Poets’ collection
21 American Women Poets’ collection
21 American Women Poets’ collection
21 American Women Poets’ collection
21 American Women Poets’ collection
21 American Women Poets’ collection
21 American Women Poets’ collection
21 American Women Poets’ collection
21 American Women Poets’ collection
21 American Women Poets’ collection
21 American Women Poets’ collection
21 American Women Poets’ collection
21 American Women Poets’ collection
21 American Women Poets’ collection
21 American Women Poets’ collection
21 American Women Poets’ collection
21 American Women Poets’ collection
21 American Women Poets’ collection
21 American Women Poets’ collection
21 American Women Poets’ collection
21 American Women Poets’ collection
21 American Women Poets’ collection
21 American Women Poets’ collection
21 American Women Poets’ collection
21 American Women Poets’ collection
21 American Women Poets’ collection
21 American Women Poets’ collection
21 American Women Poets’ collection
21 American Women Poets’ collection
21 American Women Poets’ collection
21 American Women Poets’ collection

21 American Women Poets’ collection

Place Published: Various
Publisher: Various
Date Published: 1842 to 1996
Binding: No binding & hard cover

The collection has original material pertaining to 21 American women poets, dating from 1842-1996 a total of 63 items, specifically 29 letters, 14 pieces of ephemera, 8 typescripts / manuscripts, 8 books, and 4 photos. Includes 2 pieces from Louise Glück, the winner of the 2020 Nobel Prize in Literature:

BATES, Charlotte Fiske (signed Charlotte Rogé; American poet and associate of Longfellow).

• ALS to Mrs. Swift, 10 June 1891. Thanks Mrs. Swift for the “very sweet and heartfelt poem written for my wedding”. Signed ms., split in the center, “At Philadelphia”, July 4, 1876. On the left margin, Bates has written: “This is coming out in the Cong. this week, but as you will be away I give you this MS I have.” The words “June Missionary Church” are written in the upper right of the sheet of paper.  This is a famous, patriotic verse poem in six stanzas separated here by horizontal lines drawn by the poet.

BROWN, Alice (American novelist, poet, and platwright).

• ANS, n.d., poem: “Moon staring pale on Belgian plains, What do you see? `I see through the travail pains the time to be. Yea, honor and kinship out of that red birth – a smiling earth.”

DEUTSCH, Babette (American poet, critic, and novelist).

• TLS to Stephen Siteman, 7 May 1955, re Randophe Bourne. TLS to the poet Louis Untermeyer, 20 September 1959, with 19 lines of text, with 2 corrections in ink correcting the punctuation, re her review Lives of the Poets. Stapled to the note is a clipping of the Times Book Review giving the full text. “Writing reviews for the Times Book Review sometimes makes one feel like Procrustes….” TLS to Joseph Kover, 3 October 1972, that she was never a girl scout and cannot record a scouting experience for his boys. TLS to Barbara [Howes, American poet], 10 January 1976, re weather in Vermont and New York, her sons and other members of her family, old age (not able to visit with Howes), Howes’s next book of selected poems, and being chair of the National Book Award for Poetry. TLS to Mr. Harris, n.d., with a card signed by her and clipping, “I am not `Mrs.’ Deutsch—but use my maiden name professionally.” B&w photo, 26 April 1945, Baltimore Sun, Wide World Photos. Signed card.

DODGE, Mary Abigail (pen name, Gail Hamilton; American poet and writer).

• Signed card and signed note (“Is this the paper? Well then”).

FISHBACK, Margaret (American poet and prose author from the late 1920s until the 1960s).

• 2 ALS to Elizabeth Cleveland, 4 March and 30 September 1933, thanking Cleveland for her review in the Times Herald, with 2 envelopes and

• Signed title pages of I Feel Better Now: Verses (1932) and Out of My Head: Verses (1933), re reviews of her books.

GLÜCK, Louise (American poet, winner of the 2020 Nobel Prize in Literature).

• TLS (2 pp.) addressed Dear Ralph (probably Ralph Fletcher, poet, novelist, and children’s and young adult writer), n.d. (probably pre-1963), discusses Newton Steers (President of the Atomic Mutual Fund), her half brother-in-law and step-brother-in-law to John F. Kennedy, Soviet advances in rocketry and atomic power, touching letters from Arizona, etc. First day of issue envelope signed by Glück, 700th birthday anniversary of Dante Alighieri, post-marked 17 July 1965.

GOULD, Hannah Flagg (American poet).

• ALS to Messrs Carey & Hart, 16 December 1842, hoping to send a contribution to the Gift and asking to obtain a copy of Froissart's Chronicles in English.

JONG, Erica (American poet and novelist).

• TLS from Vance Morgan, 4 February 1996, re his admiration of her (“the feminist soul through Fear of Flying”) and the dichotomy between heart and mind; Jong appends a reply to Morgan’s letter that the “heart & mind coexist in one organism” and cannot be separated.

KIMBALL, Harriet McEwan (American poet).

• Signed ms. of 8 lines of poetry, 2 stanzas, “The Past is past… I need and love a helping hand”, Portsmouth, N.H., May 1858.

LOWELL, Amy (American poet of the Imagist school who posthumously was awarded the Pulitzer Prize for Poetry in 1926). TLS to Miss Opdycke, 4 April 1923, thanking Opdycke for reading her poems and Lowell’s poems were the reason for Opdycke going to Charleston.

MILLER, Alice (American poet, novelist, and screen writer).

• Card signed in ink, [1930?], featuring original mixed media illustration by notable collector H.M. Brehm, photo image of Miller on the verso.

MOORE, Marianne (American poet).

• TLS to Gene De Gruson, editor of the Midwest Quarterly, 8 July 1965, with envelope, declines to send a poem to the magazine, “over-pressed” attempting to write a book review.

• B&w photo of Moore on her 80th birthday at the Phoenix Book Shop, 1980, signed by Robert A. Wilson, the photographer.

• Photo postcard by Richard Avedon, 1958.

MOULTON, Louise Chandler (American poet, story-writer and critic).

• Swallow-Flights. London: Macmillan and Co., 1878. Dark green cloth with double gilt fillets. • First English ed. of Poems and first edition with this title, BAL 14663. A presentation copy inscribed on the half title, “Will dear Lady Ashburton [Louisa Caroline Baring, Lady Ashburton, a Scottish art collector and philanthropist] honour these rhymes by accepting them with the dear love of the Rhymer? September 17 – 1887.” Stamp of Kent House, Knightsbridge, home of Lady Ashburton. 2 authorial corrections on pp. 41-2.

• Jessie’s Neighbor. Boston: Little, Brown, and Company, 1900, green pictorial cloth, discreet ex-library labels on front endpapers, corners bumped and small marking on the lower board, with signed card, “With cordial good wishes of | Yours sincerely | Louise Chandler Moulton | November 4- | 1886.” “A Painted Fan”, ms. excerpt from signed poem, 8 lines, beginning “Had you owned but the skill to snare as well”, May 1882. “Autumn days”,

• ms. excerpt from signed poem, 4 lines, beginning “Autumn days no solace bring”, 17 March 1900.

• ALS to Major James Pond of the Pond Lecture Bureau, 10 January ?, thanking him for inviting her to a series of lectures by Dean Stubbs and regretting that she has previous engagements for the Monday, Wednesday and Thursday evenings. "This last I most especially regret. I do so want to hear Dean Stubbs speak of Ely. Will there be another opportunity? I have promised to take part in an Authors' Reading, for the College Club, to-morrow night. I wish I hadn't, for I would far rather listen to Dean Stubbs.”

• Signed card: “With best wishes of Louise Chandler Moulton”.

PEABODY, Josephine Preston (American poet and dramatist).

• The Piper: A Play in Four Acts. London: Constable, 1910. Red cloth, tipped-in photo and note, 9 August 1910, and ALS to Nelto Williams (Ellen Dolga Dormie “Nelto” Williams Beazley), 11 May 1910, thanking Williams for her appreciation of the play, their deferred lunch, and that the première of the play at Stratford-on-Avon, acted by F. R. Benson, has been postponed till the end of July or 1 August.

• Harvest Moon and Other Poems. Boston: Houghton Mifflin Company, 1916. Tan cloth and green paper covered boards, torn and chipped but good jacket nonetheless, with signature of Peabody affixed to the front free endpaper

• ms., 1 p., of her war-related poem, “Dominion” (1917; on p. 12 of the book).

• With a brochure from Houghton Mifflin advertising her books.

PERRY, Nora (American poet, journalist, and writer of juvenile stories).

• Fragments of 2 ALS, [pre-1896], expressing sympathy to a correspondent and seeing Dr. B. in Providence who has been a great help to her work.

PIERCY, Marge (American poet and novelist).

• TLS to Vance Morgan, 4 March 1996, has signed the books, cannot comment on the creative process, gets almost a letter a week asking the same question, refers Morgan to her book of craft essays, Parti-Colored Blocks for a Quilt.

SANGSTER, Margaret Elizabeth (American poet).

• ALS to Miss [Susie Barstow] Skeddding, 4 May 1888, apologizes for the delay in her reply (“I am always happy to have any of my poems used in your dainty and beautiful work”).

• Janet Ward, a Daughter of the Manse. New York: Fleming H. Revell Company, 1902; 4th ed., pictorial green cloth stamped in white, covers worn and fraying at the bottom;

• ALS from Sangster to Mrs. Henry T. Gray (Emma), 23 December 1902, re their friendship, tipped on front endpaper.

• ALS to “My dear little friend”, n.d., sending her autograph.

SPEYER, Leonora (American poet and violinist, winner of the 1927 Pulitzer Prize for Poetry).

• Slow Wall: Poems, New & Selected. New York: Alfred A. Knopf, 1939. Dark blue cloth.

• Slow Wall: Poems Together with Nor without Music. New York: Alfred A. Knopf, 1951. Green cloth. Signed on the front free endpaper with a long inscription for Dr. Jack and Selma Mainer, June 1952.

• 2 ALS with envelopes to the Mainers, [13 June 1952] and 6 November 1952 and , re the lovely dinner, talking further with Dr. Mainer when she has an X ray, meeting together, her eyes are better, wishes she could sleep.

• 3 ALS with 2 envelopes to Marie Bullock, 17 Nov., 3 December 1938, and 29 June [1939], committee meeting at the MacDonell Club, thanking her for the “sweet little note”, hoping to meet her, now back home, her home in the Black Forest, “the forces of evil are let loose”.

• 2 signed handwritten notes on personalized stationery, 20 September (also 25 October) and 21 September, no year specified. One appears to be scheduling dinner and drinks with Jay and others with reference to Gramercy Park in Manhattan and the other is setting a meeting with someone named Catherine.

• Advertisement of a meeting of the New York Browning Society, the Waldorf-Astoria, 13 March 1940, Elizabeth Barrett Browning day, “The Power of a Personal Devotion”, Speyer giving the address.

TEASDALE, Sara (American poet).

• ALS to Grace Hazard Conkling (fellow poet), 10 September 1916, with envelope, re charming poems of Conkling’s little girl and the publication of Conkling’s “I will not give thee all of my heart” in an anthology entitled The American Voice: One Hundred Love Lyrics.

• Signature with photoprint of Teasdale with printed poem and typescript, “Flames”. Christmas note 1986 from Warren Ed Vivian Buchan

• with print of Teasdale’s poem, “November”.

THAXTER, Celia (American poet).

• ALS to Mrs. West, August 1877 (Monday evening), “Do not desert us! Pray do come back & let us hear your beautiful voice!”

WAKOSKI, Diane (American poet).

• TLS to Greg and Martha, 26 September 1978, enclosing Pachelbel’s Canon, Sparrow 71 (August 1978), re their going to Japan, being a visiting writer in Hawaii, Japanese Hawaiians, her WWII prejudice against Japanese culture, refers to the title poem which mentions Greg, Martha, and Michael reading “at that bookstore in LA with only 6 people in the audience.” Short • TLS to Sandy Morgan, 31 October 1980, “so good to have one serious reader. Best wishes for you in these strange times.”

• TLS to Gil Moody of the Word Bookstore, 24 and 29 July 1984, re signing books and bookplates, sending photos, and leaving for 6 weeks to Yugoslavia.

• Signed typescripts of 3 poems, “Sleep”, “To the Young Man Who Left the Flowers on My Desk One April Afternoon”, and “Summer” (dated February 1972 on the verso in another hand), 1 p. each, n.d.

Collection on consignment with LDRB.
Good. Item #8446

$5,500.00 USD
$6,916.64 CAD

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