ALBERTA ACT. An Act to establish and provide for the Government of the Province of Alberta. Government of Canada.
ALBERTA ACT. An Act to establish and provide for the Government of the Province of Alberta
ALBERTA ACT. An Act to establish and provide for the Government of the Province of Alberta
ALBERTA ACT. An Act to establish and provide for the Government of the Province of Alberta

ALBERTA ACT. An Act to establish and provide for the Government of the Province of Alberta

Place Published: Ottawa
Publisher: S. E. Dawson
Date Published: 1905
Edition: 1st Edition
Binding: No binding

RARE AND SIGNIFICANT 1905 CANADIAN CONSTITUTION RELATED DOCUMENT

The Alberta Act in 1905 is part of the Constitution of Canada.

1st Edition. 6-3/8 x 9-5/8 inches. 4-5 Edward VII, Chapter 3 (Statutes of Canada). Caption title, Self-bound. 17 pages. Royal coat of arms. Neatly extracted from a bound volume and expertly mended. Near fine condition.

By virtue of the provisions outlined in the British North America Act, 1867 (30 & 31 Victoria, Chapter 3; U.K.) for the addition of new provinces to the Dominion of Canada, this Act established the new Province of Alberta.

The Act defined its physical land boundaries and details on federal representation in the House of Commons and Senate, electoral divisions, election of members to Parliament, powers of the Lieutenant Governor and Council, the Provincial Legislature and Legislative Assembly, law courts, operation of joint-stock companies, education, annual payments to the province and other compensation, land management (including crown lands, mines, mineral rights and royalties, and water rights), protection of Hudson Bay Company rights and properties, and protection of rights of the Canadian Pacific Railway Company. Section 21 of the Alberta Act was controversial because it allowed the government of the Dominion of Canada to maintain absolute control over natural resources and public lands within the new province (unlike the situation in older provinces that retained control over their public lands and natural resources). It was not until the passing of the Alberta Natural Resources Act, 1930 that the province gained control over its public lands and natural resources. The Province of Alberta was named after Princess Louise Caroline Alberta (1848-1939), the fourth daughter of Queen Victoria and the wife of John Campbell, the Marquis of Lorne, who was the Governor General of Canada from 1878 to 1883.

Sir Wilfrid Laurier, prime minister of Canada 1896–1911, lawyer, journalist, politician As leader of the Liberal Party 1887–1919 and prime minister 1896-1911, Laurier was the dominant political figure of his era. In 1905, Laurier succeeded in adding two new provinces to the Dominion of Canada: Alberta and Saskatchewan.
Near Fine. Item #8424

$4,000.00 USD
$5,066.81 CAD

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