It blows, it snows; a winter's rambles through Canada. H. C. C..
It blows, it snows; a winter's rambles through Canada
It blows, it snows; a winter's rambles through Canada
It blows, it snows; a winter's rambles through Canada
It blows, it snows; a winter's rambles through Canada
It blows, it snows; a winter's rambles through Canada
It blows, it snows; a winter's rambles through Canada
It blows, it snows; a winter's rambles through Canada
It blows, it snows; a winter's rambles through Canada
It blows, it snows; a winter's rambles through Canada
It blows, it snows; a winter's rambles through Canada
It blows, it snows; a winter's rambles through Canada

It blows, it snows; a winter's rambles through Canada

Place Published: Dublin
Publisher: P.W. Brady, 2 Ormand Quay
Date Published: 1846
Edition: 1st Edition
Binding: Hard Cover

SCARCE EARLY 1844-1845 TRAVELS IN CANADA EAST & WEST

First edition. 1846. Dublin, P.W. Brady, 2 Ormand Quay, 4-1/4 x 7-1/2 inches. viii, 224pp. , [1, errata p. [225]. Original blind stamped brown cloth, lettered in gilt to the front cover, cloth a little discoloured on spine. Top inch of the title page has been replaced with near matching paper. Otherwise, good condition.

The author is stated as H.C.C. and a man in the way of referring in the dedicatory epistle where the author refers to he/his/hiself, well as his physical adventures.

Contents show there is 7 letters from I to VII giving the story of his adventures.

He travelled through both Canadas in winter months during November 1844 to February 1845.

"Rambles in Lower and Upper Canada, 1844-1845"- TPL 2720

"--I snatch'd her from the rigid north And bore her nearer to the sun. --Young."

H.C.C. was struck by the use of both languages in the House of Assembly, and contrasted the “ancient French” and the “modern English” languages. “In the aftermath of the Rebellion, C.H.C. observed political and religious animosity, especially in the Ottawa region.”— Elizabeth Waterston, 1989.

“Not everyone was charmed by the ubiquity of Methodist singing. In It Blows, It Snows (Dublin 1845) a traveller through Canada who identifies himself as C.H.C. complains that The inconsiderate habit... of singing hymns and psalms on almost every occasion... is practised among almost every religious persuasion; though I find by the methodistical part of the community its observance is appropriated to a larger share... than by any other. The stranger... must not take it for granted that... such is practised either for the express purpose of communing with the spiritual Author of all consolation, or sounding the depth of His praises on high, for such is not in anywise the case; the music appertains solely to... the lessening of bodily inconveniences... compelling the resources of the mind to take share in the burthen of the operations. The furrowed frill that binds the neck of the lady cannot be laid across the symmetrical restrictions of the Italian iron without an hymn. The gesticulations of the churn-dash are ineffectual without an incantation. And the querulous sigh of the bellowsresigns its claim upon ignition bereft of doxology. Whether C.H.C. enjoyed the custom or not, clearly hymn-singing was broadly integrated in the day-to-day life of Canadians.” Hymns and Hymn Tunes, Beckwith ; Osborne, p.12.
Very Good. Item #8263

$1,500.00 USD
$2,011.01 CAD

See all items in Canadiana, Early Travel, Women
See all items by