Frank Lee Farnell literary archives collection. Frank Lee FARNELL.
Frank Lee Farnell literary archives collection
Frank Lee Farnell literary archives collection
Frank Lee Farnell literary archives collection
Frank Lee Farnell literary archives collection
Frank Lee Farnell literary archives collection
Frank Lee Farnell literary archives collection
Frank Lee Farnell literary archives collection
Frank Lee Farnell literary archives collection
Frank Lee Farnell literary archives collection
Frank Lee Farnell literary archives collection
Frank Lee Farnell literary archives collection
Frank Lee Farnell literary archives collection
Frank Lee Farnell literary archives collection
Frank Lee Farnell literary archives collection
Frank Lee Farnell literary archives collection
Frank Lee Farnell literary archives collection
Frank Lee Farnell literary archives collection
Frank Lee Farnell literary archives collection
Frank Lee Farnell literary archives collection
Frank Lee Farnell literary archives collection
Frank Lee Farnell literary archives collection
Frank Lee Farnell literary archives collection
Frank Lee Farnell literary archives collection
Frank Lee Farnell literary archives collection
Frank Lee Farnell literary archives collection
Frank Lee Farnell literary archives collection
Frank Lee Farnell literary archives collection
Frank Lee Farnell literary archives collection
Frank Lee Farnell literary archives collection
Frank Lee Farnell literary archives collection
Frank Lee Farnell literary archives collection
Frank Lee Farnell literary archives collection
Frank Lee Farnell literary archives collection
Frank Lee Farnell literary archives collection
Frank Lee Farnell literary archives collection
Frank Lee Farnell literary archives collection

Frank Lee Farnell literary archives collection

Date Published: 1880-1898
Binding: No binding

Frank Lee Farnell, born in New Haven, Conn., was the editor of Young Folks’ Letter Bureau (Boston), Frank Leslie’s Pleasant Hours for Boys and Girls (1890s), Frank Leslie’s Popular Monthly (1895-), and The Authors’ Journal (New York, 1895-6). He was also the president and secretary of New York’s Philomathean Society in 1898 (member in the 1880s onwards), the head of the United Literary Press / Bureau (after 1898), and founder and president of the Writers’ Club of the Brooklyn (established 1895). His father, Alfred Francis Farnell (1835-1908), was an antiquarian bookseller who emigrated from Yorkshire, England to New Haven in 1865, set up a circulating library, and moved to Brooklyn, New York with businesses under the names of A.F. Farnell & Sons and Ye Olde Booke Shoppe (the bookstore that purchased Herman Melville’s library in 1891). The Farnell family also included Maud M. Farnell, Henry A. Farnell, and Fred W. Farnell. Frank Lee Farnell married Genevieve Lucile Browne of Cincinnati in 1898.

The archives collection consists of approximately 250 pp. of poems, stories and articles, 3 photos; 12 letters and notes. 1880-1898, and ephemera

Manuscripts of Poems & Stories:

• Manuscripts of poems, approximately 33 poems, 1881-1893:

“What, still another encore….”; “Be Gone!” (4 drafts);

“The Shipwreck”;

“Joseph Folger Barnard” (lawyer and Judge Justice of the New York Supreme Court);

“A Cat’s Musings”;

“Love’s First Dream”, also titled “First Love” (5 drafts);

“Teddie’s Wish”; “Neptune’s Grief” (2 drafts);

“After-Thought”;

“Deep is the ocean, fathomless….”;

“The Lover’s Advice”;

“Into cool waters of a deep-running stream….”;

“The Rain Imps Watering Can”;

“A Pretty Girl’s Secret”,

ts.; “O’er Leaping Carefulness”;

“Rhymes”;

“After Thought”’;

“The Rain”;

“Peace”;

“Fallnever wheelmen gathered one day”;

“Sitting in an `L’ Car”;

“Larky’s Poems”;

“Who Was It”;

“A bald headed man to the Black Crook went….”;

“A Family Affair”;

Galley of a series of poems,

“Man the Creator”,

“Gleams of the Golden Age”,

“The Nail-Torn God”,

“World of My Heart”,

“Art and Her Mystery”,

“Night Moths”,

“Love’s Final Nay and Yea”,

“Sonnets of Valor and Vision”;

“A Notable Rejection”.

• Manuscripts of stories and articles, approximately 220 pp., 1882-1890s:

“Frank’s Mean Trick”;

“Outdoor Sports: II Swimming”;

“A Walk to Coney Island”; “The robbery of the US Treasury….”;

“Cold Spring”;

“The Lamplighter, a Sketch”;

“Favorite Story Writers for Young People: Olive Optic, Edward S. Ellis, Nora Perry, J.T. Trowbridge, Susan Coolidge” (galley proofs);

“The Common House Spider”;

“The Commuting Power”;

“A Young Man’s View of Life”;

“Book Auctions”;

“Fulton Street”;

“I was moved to smile….”;

“A Visit of Mrs. Jones”;

“I took up a diary and was inspired….”;

“Methods of Advertising”;

“A Ride in a Horse Car”;

“Speech: in the negative of this question, resolved that the public in this country are generally deprived of the official services of some of our best men by the reckless abuse of the press during elections times”;

“Editors as a rule are very busy persons….”;

“One of the familiar faces on the streets of New York….”;

“New York Letter”;

“Nice Little Long Island Farms:,

ts.; “We all know that this society has just passed….”;

“The Greenville Hunting Club”;

“Sat July 1st Took 3 o’clock boat, where I met Charlie Brown and Fred Colver, to Cold Spring….”;

“Another Paper, Editorial”;

“The Butterfly”;

“On Sunday February 26….”;

“About eleven o’clock PM on Sunday May 21, 1882….”;

“One Lesson on the Wheel”;

“Jumbo in Brooklyn”;

“Juvenile Literature: The Editor’s Talks on the New Books for Boys and Girls” (galley proofs);

“The hardest part of Ethel Jules’ daily life….”;

“The House Spider”;

“Story for Boys”;

“Special Announcement, an Attractive Series of Sketches”;

“A few days last week were take up….” (editorial);

“Cure for Mosquito Bites”;

“Temperance Teaching in the Schools”;

“A Social Gathering at the House of Mrs/ A. Farnell”:

“How Gold Is Obtained”;

“If the sun don’t shine….”;

“The Duke of Wellington once asked the novelist….”;

“Maudie Sayings”; “Debate, resolved that there should be a national cemetery at Washington for the internment of our illustrious dead”.

Correspondence, 16 letters and set of notes, 1880-1896:

• Mathematical and scientific notes with envelope addressed to Genevieve L. Browne;

• ALS from Josie R. Nicholls with envelope enclosing ts. of poem, “Fame. From Two Points of View”;

• ALS to his father (“Vote for Cleveland”);

• ALS from John Trusdell enclosing an ode;

• ALS from George T. Farnell, Principal, Pamlico Male and Female Institute;

• 5 ALS from John J. Kennedy re his novel and 2 ALS from Farnell to Kennedy, with envelopes;

• 2 ALS from F.W. Farnell, his brother (owner of Farnell’s Troy Laundry Agency);

• ALS from J.J. Smith;

• ALS from Farnell addressed Dear Ernest [P. Neville?], re editorial staffing of The Adventurer; • • ALS from I.J. Hughes, with envelope;

• ALS from Oswald Wood Henning.

Ephemera, approximately 100 items including small newspaper clippings, 1883-1898:

• 7 b&w photos, all except one unidentified, of 3 women, a man, a woman (W.B. Harper’s mother), and a child; music, conductors, lead sheet, grand entre, Rollin Band;

• Rules of the Brooklyn Savings Association;

• News clippings, printed leaflets, and brochures pertaining to the American Authors’ Guild (roll of membership, and minutes of a meeting),

• Association of America Authors (secretary’s report, Charles Burr Todd, of the methods and results of the French Société des gens de letters and of the British Society of Authors),

• Philomathean Alumni, Young Folks’ Letter Bureau,

• United Literary Press (publication of Lu Senarens’s “The Bell in the Steeple Far Away”),

• The Authors’ Journal, Rosebuds: A Monthly Magazine for Children (verso Farnell’s “Advertising in Juvenile Magazines”),

• Willcox & Gibbs Improved Ruffler, St. Mark’s Church in-the-Bouwerie, and the Writers’ Club of Brooklyn.

Collection on consignment with LDRB.
Item #8240

$2,500.00 USD
$3,400.14 CAD

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