Boston Weekly Messenger Rouses Point article regarding Fort "Blunder" later rebuilt as Fort Montgomery. Boston Weekly Messenger newspaper.
Boston Weekly Messenger Rouses Point article regarding Fort "Blunder" later rebuilt as Fort Montgomery.

Boston Weekly Messenger Rouses Point article regarding Fort "Blunder" later rebuilt as Fort Montgomery.

Place Published: Boston
Publisher: Boston Weekly Messenger
Date Published: 1818
Edition: 1st Edition
Binding: No binding

THE FORT THAT AMERICA ACCIDENTALLY BUILT IN CANADA

1818 Boston Weekly Messenger December 10th issue, with a small article regarding Fort "Blunder" later rebuilt as Fort Montgomery.

ALBANY, Dec. 1 (1818) referring to the new boundary line crossing the line 1 mile south of the former line and as such the recently erected fortifications on Rouses Point fall within the province of Lower Canada. Comments on other places south of the new boundary to build a new fortification. A quote from the Montreal Herald announcing the new Fort is on Canada's side of line 45 and thus built on British territory and little doubt who the Fort now belongs to.

This is how the original Fort Montgomery became known as Fort "Blunder" - The Fort That America Accidentally Built in Canada. This event caused great pain and embarrassment for US until 1842. The US had already spent $275,000 on construction, which was then quite a bit of money in 1816-1818. The US government immediately ordered a halt to construction and abandoned the site.

Some background on Rouses Point Fort "Blunder"

"It was shortly after the War of 1812 that the tiny sand island in Rouses Point was fortified for the first time. Repeatedly mighty armies and massive naval flotillas had traversed the narrow reaches of the river between what is now known as New York and Vermont. The small islands to the north, Hospital Island, Ash Island, Isle aux Noix, had been the scene of frantic military activity and unspeakable suffering as these powerful forces drove north and south along the river. The sand spit known as Island Point would be fortified in an attempt to prevent these forces from using the waterway again.

On April 18, 1818, the state of New York ceded Island Point and some 400 acres to the west to the United States government for use as a military reservation. It had “...been deemed requisite by the President of the United States that fortifications should be erected...” here at this strategic location. Interestingly enough, the land was officially turned over to the federal government well after work had begun on the fort. Construction of a fort here began almost two years previously, in the fall of 1816.

It was not until 1842, with the ratification of the Webster-Ashburton Treaty and an adjustment in the border at Rouses Point, that Island Point reverted to United States control. By then, the fort had been somewhat dismantled by predation by enterprising local citizens." Quoted from Historic Lakes web site.
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