Two (2) Portland Advertiser newspapers 1837 Lower Canada Rebellion articles. Portland Advertiser, Gazette of Maine newspapers.
Two (2) Portland Advertiser newspapers 1837 Lower Canada Rebellion articles.
Two (2) Portland Advertiser newspapers 1837 Lower Canada Rebellion articles.
Two (2) Portland Advertiser newspapers 1837 Lower Canada Rebellion articles.
Two (2) Portland Advertiser newspapers 1837 Lower Canada Rebellion articles.

Two (2) Portland Advertiser newspapers 1837 Lower Canada Rebellion articles.

Place Published: Portland, ME
Publisher: Portland Advertiser
Date Published: 1837
Edition: 1st Edition
Binding: No binding

Two (2) Portland Advertiser and Gazette of Maine newspapers 1837 Lower Canada Rebellion articles.

1) 1837 August 25, P.2, col. 7 - "The Canadian Agitor" L.J. Papineau and Lord Gosford correspondence 5 col. inches.

2) 1837 September 1, P.3, Col. 4, - "LOWER CANADA" response to Lord Gosford (dismissed) as well Papineau. 4-1/2 col. inches.

The subject of the discussion in the Papineau and Gosford letters published in these newspapers revolves around the famous 92 Resolutions drafted in January 1834 by Louis-Joseph Papineau, leader of the Parti patriote, and Augustin-Norbert Morin, the 92 Resolutions were a list of grievances and demands made by the Parti patriote with regards to the state of the colonial political system. They were drafted following a long political struggle against the governor general and Château Clique and the Patriotes’ inability to produce any significant reforms. The document critiqued the division of authority in the colony and demanded a government that was responsible to the Legislative Assembly. The imperial government responded with the Russell Resolutions, which rejected their demands, preparing the way for the Canadian Rebellion. Though the 92 Resolutions were not the only cause of the Canadian Rebellion, they sped up the march that eventually ended in rebellion. After years of frustration, the 92 Resolutions and Russell Resolutions not only showed many Patriotes that reform could not be achieved via constitutional means, but it even convinced some that nothing could be achieved through peaceful means. Starting in the spring of 1837, supporters of the Parti patriote thus mobilized throughout the colony, organizing in large public assemblies, where they denounced the Russell Resolutions, the imperial government and, in some cases, even promoted violence and rebellion. Fearing that these assemblies would soon turn to disorder, Lord Gosford, on 15 June 1837, made them illegal. However, they did not end. quoted from the Canadian Encyclopedia online

The Portland Advertiser and Gazette of Maine (Portland, Me.) was a Weekly newspaper published from 1829 to 1841 under this name.
Fair. Item #8218

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