Jacob Jordan, William Claus legal papers. Jacob JORDAN, William CLAUS, Hon. Chief Justice James REID.
Jacob Jordan, William Claus legal papers
Jacob Jordan, William Claus legal papers
Jacob Jordan, William Claus legal papers
Jacob Jordan, William Claus legal papers
Jacob Jordan, William Claus legal papers
Jacob Jordan, William Claus legal papers
Jacob Jordan, William Claus legal papers
Jacob Jordan, William Claus legal papers

Jacob Jordan, William Claus legal papers

Date Published: 1801-02
Binding: No binding

32 legal manuscript documents including letters and documents dating from ND, 1801, 1802, 1803 and 1804.

The legal documents are regarding monies owed and the sale of Jacob Jordan’s (1770-1829) house and land in Terrebonne, Québec. A number of people are seeking payments including a Montreal merchant , Samuel Dumas. William Claus and his wife Catherine Jordan are also seeking inheritance monies as is Jacob Jordan (1770-1829) Catherine's brother. A most interesting insight into the financial realities at the turn of the 18th century in early Québec.

FATHER:

Jacob Jordan (1741-1796) was a seigneur, businessman and political figure in Quebec and Lower Canada. He was born in England in 1741 and came to Canada in 1761 or earlier. He was an agent at Montreal for a London-based firm that supplied provisions for British troops in North America. His business partner at Quebec was Colin Drummond, father of General Sir Gordon Drummond. Jordan held lands in New Brunswick and Vermont. He expanded into the grain trade and also became agent for the Saint-Maurice ironworks. In 1767, he married Ann Livingston; they had ten children. In 1776, he was named deputy paymaster general. In 1784, he purchased the seigneury of Terrebonne, which included gristmills valuable to Jordan for the production of flour, from Pierre-Paul Margane de Lavaltrie. He was also partner in the operation of a tobacco factory, the Montreal Distilling Company and a bakery at Montreal. He also became involved in the fur trade, in competition with the North West Company. Jordan represented Effingham County in the 1st Parliament of Lower Canada. He died at Saint-Louis-de-Terrebonne (later Terrebonne) in 1796, while still in office.

SON:

Jacob Jordan (1770-1829) was a seigneur, soldier, businessman and political figure in Lower Canada. He represented Effingham in the Legislative Assembly of Lower Canada from 1796 to 1800. He was born in Montreal, the son of Jacob Jordan and Ann Livingston. Jordan served in the British infantry, reaching the rank of lieutenant-colonel. In 1793, he married Catherine Grant. Jordan inherited the seigneury of Terrebonne from his father in 1796, owning it until 1802. In 1797, he retired from the army on half-pay. Jordan was involved in the grain trade and in exporting goods. He also served as justice of the peace. Jordan did not run for re-election to the assembly in 1800. Later in life, he served as governor of an island in the West Indies. He died in England.

DAUGHTER:

William Claus (1765-1826) was an army and militia officer, Indian Department official, office holder, justice of the peace and politician. He was the grandson of Sir William Johnson. He was associated with the Indian Department, achieving the rank of deputy superintendent in 1799. He was a member of the Legislative Council of Upper Canada, 1812-1825, and of the Executive Council, 1818-1824. Married. 25 Feb. 1791 Catherine Jordan, eldest daughter of Jacob Jordan (1741-1796). They had three sons and two daughters who survived to adulthood. His uncle was Sir John Johnson Died Nov. 1826 in Niagara (Niagara-on-the-Lake), Upper Canada.

On consignment with LDRB.
Item #8141

$1,750.00 USD
$2,235.58 CAD