Beatrice Harraden collection of 12 Autographed Letters Signed. Beatrice HARRADEN.
Beatrice Harraden collection of 12 Autographed Letters Signed
Beatrice Harraden collection of 12 Autographed Letters Signed
Beatrice Harraden collection of 12 Autographed Letters Signed
Beatrice Harraden collection of 12 Autographed Letters Signed
Beatrice Harraden collection of 12 Autographed Letters Signed
Beatrice Harraden collection of 12 Autographed Letters Signed
Beatrice Harraden collection of 12 Autographed Letters Signed
Beatrice Harraden collection of 12 Autographed Letters Signed

Beatrice Harraden collection of 12 Autographed Letters Signed

Date Published: [1890] to 1914
Binding: No binding

Beatrice Harraden was an influential British novelist, publishing seventeen novels, besides journalism and letters to the editor, short stories, a suffrage play and pamphlet, and children's books. She was a leader of the suffragette movement, the Women’s Social and Political Union. Her novel, Ships That Pass in the Night (1893), a love story set in a tuberculosis sanatorium, sold over one million copies. In 1883, she received her BA degree as well as an honors degree in Classics and Mathematics, which would have been a noteworthy feat for a woman in this era.

The collection contains 12 Autographed Letters Signed, circa 1890s-1914.

12 Autographed Letters Signed (ALS):

• ALS to Mr. Tooley, Tuesday, n.d. but circa 1900: “I have marked only what I would rather you left out if you would kindly oblige me. Do you not think you might mention it at Hilda [Strafford] is in her 10th (tenth) edition & in varying woods in the 12th. Also it is correct that a publisher was found with difficulty. Lawrence & Bullen took it at once after Mr. Blackwood’s refusal & he and they think were the only publishers who saw it. I have scratched out one comment about my father. He did not like to be written about really. Although I think he would have been pleased with the letter. I am so glad you liked it. yours very sincerely Beatrice Harraden. Be sure you let me have back M.S.S. of Ships.”

• ALS addressed Dear Sir, 9 July, “Regret that I cannot write my experience in connection with the supernatural. I am this moment off on my holiday. Very truly yours Beatrice Harraden.”

• ALS addressed “Dear Madame”, 8 February 1914, apologizes for not answering a letter sooner. She continues; “I should be very pleased to grant you permission to do as you suggest, but a friend of mine has compiled a little book of `extracts’ which she has asked my permission to publish, so I am afraid there is nothing more to be said.” However, “... if your little book was intended to be one of a series. I may have to come to a different decision.” Evidently the recipient had proposed publishing a book of extracts from Harraden’s writings.

• 5 ALS to Morley [possibly the journalist Professor Henry Morley, 1822-1894], in all 5 pp. and 2 correspondence cards, 5, Cannon Place, Hampstead Heath, N.W., all undated. Making and breaking engagements, hoping to see his portrait, giving news of her sister's and her own health (“'I am awfully rushed just now, but with my work & the demands of the suffrage & everyone's illnesses!').

• 2 ALS ( 5 pages total) on printed letterheads of 5, Cannon Place, Hampstead Heath, N.W., 13 December and 12 January (no year, but with one holograph mailing envelope postmarked 13 January 1897; usual soiling and wear; torn open), to fellow novelist, May Crommelin, sending regards to her and her sister, reporting on Harraden's ill health (and related travels), trying to arrange work for her own sister, hoping to schedule a meeting, and mentioning one of Crommelin's works: "[13 Dec] . . . I am not faring very well out of the sunshine, & think I shall have to return to California where I can enjoy life very well provided I do not write. But for all that, there is no country like the old beloved country, & those who cannot lead the life here, go away with a terribly big lump in their throats. . . .";"[12 Jan] . . . I never forgot Brown Eyes, that sweet story of the Zuyder See [sic], wasn't it?".

• ALS to Miss Welch, from her home in South Hampstead: "Dear Miss Welch, I've tried and tried and have come to the same conclusion that it cannot be done.Please forgive me for having troubled you. Sincerely Beatrice Harraden." On heavy stock paper with address printed at top.

• ALS (2 pp.), on (faintly ruled) onion paper, Montreal [?], 13 Jan. (no year), to Charles Welsh, explaining that she is "returning to England in a few days, when I hope to call in one morning & inquire if you are going to make any use of my 'Idylls', & hear from you about the little Fairy Book.  I have had some very delightful letters about it from children, and from stern literary friends….”

Collection on consignment with LDRB.
Item #8130

$1,000.00 USD
$1,334.52 CAD

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