Robert Falconer, President of the University of Toronto, ALS to Sir James P. Whitney. Sir Robert Alexander FALCONER, Sir James P. WHITNEY, Count Albert APPONYI, provenance, subject.
Robert Falconer, President of the University of Toronto, ALS to Sir James P. Whitney
Robert Falconer, President of the University of Toronto, ALS to Sir James P. Whitney
Robert Falconer, President of the University of Toronto, ALS to Sir James P. Whitney

Robert Falconer, President of the University of Toronto, ALS to Sir James P. Whitney

Place Published: Toronto
Publisher: Sir Robert Falconer
Date Published: 1911
Binding: No binding

Robert Falconer Autograph Letter Signed (ALS) as President of the University of Toronto to Sir James P. Whitney, Toronto, Feb., 21, 1911. 5 x 8 inches folded, 2 pp., signed, red seal of University of Toronto. Falconer invitation to Sir James P. Whitney for a luncheon with Count Apponyi, the Hungarian Minister of Religion and Education and noted education reformer.

Sir Robert Falconer is most recognized, for his 25-year tenure as president of University of Toronto (1907-32). A royal commission appointed to investigate all aspects of the university had found administrative chaos and low morale. It recommended a complete constitutional reorganization and implicitly a new president in 1906. To the surprise of many, the 40-year-old Falconer was asked to replace James Loudon. Much of Falconer's time and energy for the next 2 decades was given to executing the recommendations of the 1906 commission. He inherited a collection of colleges; he left behind him an integrated university that led the country in industrial and scientific, as well as humanistic, research.

Count Apponyi (1846-1933) was a Hungarian statesman whose political philosophy blended the conservative traditions of his background with Hungarian nationalism. Entering the Hungarian Parliament in 1872, Apponyi remained a member of it, with one short exception, until 1918. As Minister Minister of Religion and Education of Hungary, Apponyi introduced changes in the school curricula that were greatly resented by the non-Magyars for their Magyarizing tendencies.

Also included, Whitney’s reply, on the same day in his type-written answer, not signed, Sir Whitney declines the invitation.

Sir James P. Whitney (1843-1914) was the conservative Prime Minister of Ontario.
Item #8120

$265.00 USD
$360.05 CAD