Robert Stanton ALS to the Receiver General for a sum of more than 5,000 pounds. Robert STANTON, William MORRIS.
Robert Stanton ALS to the Receiver General for a sum of more than 5,000 pounds
Robert Stanton ALS to the Receiver General for a sum of more than 5,000 pounds
Robert Stanton ALS to the Receiver General for a sum of more than 5,000 pounds
Robert Stanton ALS to the Receiver General for a sum of more than 5,000 pounds
Robert Stanton ALS to the Receiver General for a sum of more than 5,000 pounds

Robert Stanton ALS to the Receiver General for a sum of more than 5,000 pounds

Date Published: 1845
Binding: Hard & Soft cover

UNCOMMON TRADE DETAILS INSIGHT FOR THE PORT OF TORONTO 1845

Customs in the Port of Toronto, sent to William Morris, Receiver General, Montreal. Folio, one page, Toronto to Montreal, “Too late” rated 2/3 overweight letter, located and dated Toronto 8 april 1845. Stanton confirms to the Receiver General that he deposited to the credit of the Receiver General a sum of more than 5,000 pounds in the Bank of Upper Canada for Customs duties, Outstanding bonds, Tonnage dues, Anchor licences and duties, Harbour dues and Seizures for the activities of the Port of Toronto.

In 1834 the town of York has a population of 9,254. and it was renamed to Toronto in March 1, 1834, a Europeanized version of the original Native American name for the region. In 1838 there was no passageway to enter the harbour at its eastern end (today’s Eastern Gap did not exist), so the western entrance was the sole channel for ships entering or departing the harbour.

Robert Stanton was a businessman, public servant, publisher and a prominent member of the Family Compact. He was appointed a Home District Commissioner of Customs on 12 Aug. 1842 and Collector of Customs for the port of Toronto on 8 Aug. 1843. The announcement of his appointment created an outcry among Reformers who protested to Baldwin that giving so lucrative a post to so staunch a Tory was a curious method of carrying out the principles of responsible government. Six years later Francis Hincks, Inspector General, investigated Stanton’s administration of the Toronto Customs House. The ensuing report alleged falsification of customs records. Stanton pleaded innocent, but he and two assistants were dismissed in November 1849. He was next appointed Clerk of Process at Osgoode Hall. He died in Toronto

William Morris (1786-1858) was a businessman, militia officer, justice of the peace, politician, and school administrator. In September 1844 he accepted the receiver generalship in the Draper government. His astute business sense and eagle eye for economy made him a model receiver general, and in 1845 he moved to Montreal to be nearer his work. He later boasted that he had streamlined the department, introduced new procedures, and earned the government £11,000 of interest from his deposits of public money. In 1846 he accepted the post of President of the Executive Council and held both positions until May 1847 when he persuaded John A. Macdonald to take over from him as Receiver General. He died in Montreal.
Item #8105

$950.00 USD
$1,193.16 CAD

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