The Canadian Tariff passed in the Session of 1858. Alphabetically Arranged for the Montreal Herald broadside. Legislative Assembly.
The Canadian Tariff passed in the Session of 1858. Alphabetically Arranged for the Montreal Herald broadside
The Canadian Tariff passed in the Session of 1858. Alphabetically Arranged for the Montreal Herald broadside

The Canadian Tariff passed in the Session of 1858. Alphabetically Arranged for the Montreal Herald broadside

Place Published: Montreal
Publisher: Montreal Herald
Date Published: [1858]
Binding: No binding

RARE PAMPHLET - NO COPIES FOUND

Broadside. 19-1/2 x 12 inches. From “Ale” to “Zinc”, including more than 325 articles in four columns. “Prohibited; Books and Drawings of an immoral or indecent character”. “Emigrants wearing apparel, tools and effects in actual use and accompanying the owner; Free”. One small hardly visible professional repair to substitute a small section of missing text (1 ½ x 1 inch in the middle of column #2), folds, creases, otherwise very good condition.

Rare and very informative early Canadian Tariff broadside.

1858 Tariff background:

The recession in 1857 sharply reduced government revenues and led the Tories to raise duties again through the Cayley-Galt Tariff of 1858 (one of the first protective tariffs in Canadian history).

Led by manufacturers from the Toronto and Hamilton areas, protectionist industries formed the Association for the Promotion of Canadian Industry to help orchestrate their lobbying effort. Others, principally those producers dependent on imports of raw materials, formed the Tariff Reform Association to lobby against further protection and any threats to reciprocity (Easterbrook and Aitken 1956, 372; Forster 1986, 35. 47). Neither organization survived after 1858, however, and the political scene was still mostly dominated by regional and local industry organizations, often separated on religious and ethnic grounds and lobbying independently to influence policy.

In 1867, the British North America Act united the provinces of Canada, New Brunswick, and Nova Scotia into a single confederation and instituted a single national tariff. The year before, the United States announced that it was abrogating the reciprocity treaty (a post- Civil War snub to Britain as

much as to Canada). The first Tarriff of the confederation, was the Dominion Tarriff of 1868." Quoted from International Trade and Political Conflict, Michael Hiscox, 2002, p.106
Item #8084

$1,000.00 USD
$1,255.96 CAD

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