[Autonomy] Bill. An Act to establish and provide for the Government of the Province of Alberta, (Reprinted as amended, and proposed to be further amended, in Committee of the Whole) No. 69, 1st Session, 10th Parliament,4-5 Edward VII, 1905 [The Alberta Act]. Sir Wilfrid LAURIER, Government of Canada.
[Autonomy] Bill. An Act to establish and provide for the Government of the Province of Alberta, (Reprinted as amended, and proposed to be further amended, in Committee of the Whole) No. 69, 1st Session, 10th Parliament,4-5 Edward VII, 1905 [The Alberta Act]
[Autonomy] Bill. An Act to establish and provide for the Government of the Province of Alberta, (Reprinted as amended, and proposed to be further amended, in Committee of the Whole) No. 69, 1st Session, 10th Parliament,4-5 Edward VII, 1905 [The Alberta Act]
[Autonomy] Bill. An Act to establish and provide for the Government of the Province of Alberta, (Reprinted as amended, and proposed to be further amended, in Committee of the Whole) No. 69, 1st Session, 10th Parliament,4-5 Edward VII, 1905 [The Alberta Act]
[Autonomy] Bill. An Act to establish and provide for the Government of the Province of Alberta, (Reprinted as amended, and proposed to be further amended, in Committee of the Whole) No. 69, 1st Session, 10th Parliament,4-5 Edward VII, 1905 [The Alberta Act]
[Autonomy] Bill. An Act to establish and provide for the Government of the Province of Alberta, (Reprinted as amended, and proposed to be further amended, in Committee of the Whole) No. 69, 1st Session, 10th Parliament,4-5 Edward VII, 1905 [The Alberta Act]

[Autonomy] Bill. An Act to establish and provide for the Government of the Province of Alberta, (Reprinted as amended, and proposed to be further amended, in Committee of the Whole) No. 69, 1st Session, 10th Parliament,4-5 Edward VII, 1905 [The Alberta Act]

Place Published: Ottawa
Publisher: S. E. Dawson
Date Published: 1905
Edition: 1st Edition
Binding: No binding

QUITE RARE AND SIGNIFICANT 1905 CANADIAN CONSTITUTION RELATED DOCUMENT

A significant constitutional Autonomy bill document in formation of Canada, and the source of much anger and dispute regarding Alberta's natural resources and public lands, religion and the French language in particular. No other copy of this document found.

16 pages, folio (8-1/2 x 13 inches. Professional restoration on some pages and some wrinkling in the last 8pp section, otherwise, very good condition.

This Bill No. 69 presents twenty-four (24) Sections on first 6-1/2 pages, followed by the Schedule, section 12, on last 9-1/2 pages.

In February 1905, Laurier, because of Frederick Haultain, could delay no longer [creating the new provinces] and personally introduced legislation to create two roughly equal, north-south provinces: Saskatchewan and Alberta.

This 16pp Autonomy Bill led to the Alberta Act being assented to on 20th July 1905.

The Alberta Act officially came into force on the first day of September 1905, during the Liberal Government of Prime Minister Sir Wilfrid Laurier. The Alberta Act is part of the Constitution of Canada. Bill No. 69 is only dated "1905", but in Section #24 (the last point in this version), it is mentioned that "This Act shall come into force on the first day of July, one thousand nine hundred and five", so just two (2) months earlier with respect to what happened in reality, as negotiation delays certainly implied that the Act finally was ready to come into force, as mentioned earlier, only at the beginning of September.

The Alberta Act was the act of the Parliament of Canada that created the province of Alberta. The Alberta Act was controversial because Section 21 of the document allowed the Government of Canada to maintain control of all of Alberta's natural resources and public lands. After that almost final version of Bill No. 69, Laurier and the Government of Canada made an additional important change that appears in the Alberta Act, to make sure it really specified how it would control the natural resources of the new Province of Alberta. To do so, Section 20 of the Bill: "The Dominion lands in the said Province shall continue to be vested in the Crown and administered by the Government of Canada for the purposes of Canada", became Section 21 in the Alberta Act with the following wording: "All Crown lands, mines and minerals and royalties incident thereto, and the interest of the Crown in the waters within the province under The North-west Irrigation Act, 1898, shall continue to be vested in the Crown and administered by the Government of Canada for the purposes of Canada." Alberta did not win control of these resources until the passage of the Natural Resources Acts in 1930. The Alberta Act is part of the Constitution of Canada.

Sir Wilfrid Laurier, prime minister of Canada 1896–1911, lawyer, journalist, politician (born 20 November 1841 in St-Lin, Canada East; died 17 February 1919 in Ottawa, ON ). As leader of the Liberal Party 1887–1919 and prime minister 1896–1911, Laurier was the dominant political figure of his era. In 1905, Laurier succeeded in adding two new provinces to the Dominion of Canada: Alberta and Saskatchewan. However, the addition of these provinces also meant that a decision had to be made regarding the educational rights of the Catholic minority. Once again, yielding to pressure from anglophones and Protestants, Laurier took refuge behind the status quo of one uniform school system, thus depriving the minorities of separate schools.
Very Good. Item #8023

$4,500.00 USD
$5,971.17 CAD

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