Appendix (No. 7 and 8) RETURN: To an address from the Legislature Assembly to His Excellency The Governor General, dated the 19th ... county of Grey and Bruce. Sir George-Étienne CARTIER, 1st Baronet.
Appendix (No. 7 and 8) RETURN: To an address from the Legislature Assembly to His Excellency The Governor General, dated the 19th ... county of Grey and Bruce...
Appendix (No. 7 and 8) RETURN: To an address from the Legislature Assembly to His Excellency The Governor General, dated the 19th ... county of Grey and Bruce...

Appendix (No. 7 and 8) RETURN: To an address from the Legislature Assembly to His Excellency The Governor General, dated the 19th ... county of Grey and Bruce...

Date Published: 1856
Binding: No binding

14pp. 6-1/4 x 9-1/2 inches, disbound, no covers

Full title: RETURN: To an address from the Legislature Assembly to His Excellency The Governor General, dated the 19th instant, praying His Excellency to cause to be laid before the House, "copies of correspondence and other documents having reference "to withdraw from sale certain lands situated in the county of Grey and Bruce, which lands were advertised to be sold on 17th October last, also report of Superintendent of Indian Affairs.

Sir George-Étienne Cartier, co-premier of the Province of Canada, lawyer, rebel, railway promoter, politician and a Father of Confederation. By “youthful folly,” Cartier likely had in mind his prominent role in the Patriote rebellion of 1837. He fought at Saint Denis, where the Patriotes turned back a column of British regulars, and later fled to the United States with a price on his head. By coincidence, one of the students hearing him that June day was the 15-year-old Louis Riel who, in 1869 and again in 1885, would lead armed rebellions of his own. As the chief voice of the French Canadian community, the pivotal point of the union, Cartier was the kingpin of the Confederation movement. He masterfully made use of his block votes, and his railway and militia interests, to engineer a new union and a new nationality. He reconciled the majority of French Canada to Confederation on the grounds that it prevented annexation by the United States and made possible the end of the Union government and the restoration of the old Province of Québec. Cartier played the primary role in bringing Manitoba and British Columbia into Confederation, and negotiated the purchase of Rupert’s Land and the North-Western Territory from the Hudson’s Bay Company. quoted form the Canadian Encyclopedia
Very Good. Item #7918

$75.00 USD
$102.91 CAD

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