Three autographed Signed Letters (ASL) of Elizabeth Missing Sewell. Elizabeth Missing SEWELL.
Three autographed Signed Letters (ASL) of Elizabeth Missing Sewell
Three autographed Signed Letters (ASL) of Elizabeth Missing Sewell
Three autographed Signed Letters (ASL) of Elizabeth Missing Sewell
Three autographed Signed Letters (ASL) of Elizabeth Missing Sewell
Three autographed Signed Letters (ASL) of Elizabeth Missing Sewell

Three autographed Signed Letters (ASL) of Elizabeth Missing Sewell

Date Published: 1876
Binding: No binding

Three autograph letters signed:

#1). Autograph letter signed. Three pages, Dated Jan[uary]30, 1871. Letter to Fannie, with intimate and suggestive comments on a book she is reading.

#2). Autograph letter signed. Three pages, 8vo. Dated July 20, [18]90. Expressing appreciation to a Mrs. Dickey for friendship and support from many in America “whom I may never meet” but whose support gives “gladness and brightness.”

#3). Autograph letter signed from F. Coddington, a pupil of Sewell’s, passing the letters along to Reverend Douglas of New York. Born.

All in good condition.

Elizabeth Missing Sewell was an English author of religious and educational texts notable in the 19th century. Born in 1815 in Newport, on the Isle of Wight, Elizabeth Missing Sewell was the daughter of solicitor Thomas Sewell, and his wife, Jane Edwards. She was educated at Miss Crooke's school in Newport, and at Misses Aldridge's school, in Bath, and returned home at the age of fifteen, in order to help teach her younger sisters. Introduced to figures in the Oxford Movement by her brother William, and influenced by the religious debate of the time, Sewell began her first work, The Cottage Monthly, Stories illustrative of the Lord's Prayer in 1840 (it was published in book form in 1843). One of her most well known works, Amy Herbert, a novel intended for young girls, was published in 1844. Sewell lived with her mother, and some of her sisters, after the death of her father in 1842, assuming ever greater responsibility for the household's finances. She and her sister Ellen eventually took pupils, describing their efforts as a 'family home,' rather than a school. Convinced of the need for better education for middle class girls, Sewell founded St. Boniface School, in Ventnor. She died in 1906.
Good. Item #5049

$245.00 USD
$325.10 CAD

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