(Sir John Moore) Retreat to Corunna coloured plate The Boy's Own Paper, August, Part 114, 1888. Sir John MOORE, subject.
(Sir John Moore) Retreat to Corunna coloured plate The Boy's Own Paper, August, Part 114, 1888
(Sir John Moore) Retreat to Corunna coloured plate The Boy's Own Paper, August, Part 114, 1888
(Sir John Moore) Retreat to Corunna coloured plate The Boy's Own Paper, August, Part 114, 1888
(Sir John Moore) Retreat to Corunna coloured plate The Boy's Own Paper, August, Part 114, 1888
(Sir John Moore) Retreat to Corunna coloured plate The Boy's Own Paper, August, Part 114, 1888
(Sir John Moore) Retreat to Corunna coloured plate The Boy's Own Paper, August, Part 114, 1888

(Sir John Moore) Retreat to Corunna coloured plate The Boy's Own Paper, August, Part 114, 1888

Place Published: Toronto, London UK
Publisher: Printed for Wm. Warwick & Son, by Dudley & Burns
Date Published: 1888
Edition: 1st Edition
Binding: Soft Cover

SCARCE COLOUR PLATE OF SIR JOHN MOORE'S RETREAT TO CORUNNA

(Sir John Moore) Retreat to Corunna coloured frontis by R. Beavis coloured plate. Paper size: 12" x 8 1/4 inches

Image size: 9 1/2 x 6 inches

Booklet; 12 x 8 3/8 inches. 4pp, light salmon paper wraps in poor condition, coloured frontis, [641]-704 plus 1 page of ads. All insides including coloured frontis in very good condition.

The Boy's Own Paper, August, Part 114, 1888

Boys' Own Paper was printed in London, UK however, also printed in Toronto by the publisher W. Warwick and Sons.

The Papers are actually identical to the British Editions, except they have a 4 page "cover", which is dated 1 month later than the contents, and which contains ads for Toronto businesses. Few episodes of British military history have been as dramatic as Sir John Moore's retreat to Corunna. March of Death is the full story of that adventure and a gripping tale of a fight for survival amidst the Spanish snow. In the bitter winter of 1808, a small British force found itself outnumbered and outmaneuvered by a French army led by none other than the emperor Napoleon. Faced with crushing defeat, the British, commanded by Sir John Moore, turned and began a legendary march through the snow and ice of northern Spain to freedom and escape. Napoleon, swearing that he would drive the British leopard into the sea, pursued and an epic was born. March of Death is the story of the terrible retreat through the eyes of those who were there and who survived. Relating the horrific ordeal through excerpts from survivors' diaries, letters, memoirs and reports, this fascinating narrative brings to life the heroism and glory of a real fight for survival.

-- Mbi Pub Co

The Battle of Corunna, 1809 Sir John Moore is one of the few soldiers who have won lasting fame by the conduct of a retreat. When he was sent to arrest the victorious march of Napoleon through the Peninsula he foretold failure. Despite many difficulties he succeeded in baffling the greatest military genius that the world has known, and in lowering the prestige of triumphant arms. With twenty thousand fighting men he invaded a country overrun by three hundred thousand veterans, and, meeting with no support from the Spaniards, struck boldly at Bonaparte's communications. The audacity of this strategy drew from Napoleon the admission that Moore was the only foe worthy of his steel. With characteristic energy Bonaparte abandoned his plan of campaign and set out in pursuit, but rumour of an alliance between Russia and Austria sent him in hot haste to Paris. Soult was left behind to drive the British into the sea. Undismayed by the overwhelming force with which he was threatened, Moore prepared to meet the French. But prudence prevailed. Madrid had capitulated without striking a blow, and the Spanish legions had melted into shadows. Eluding the snares set for him by the perfidy of persons in high places and warned by the treacherous folly of the British representative, Moore made up his mind to fall back upon the coast. His force was so reduced that he had to post his men on an inferior range of hills commanded by the artillery fire of the enemy. But advantage of position and superior numbers were of no avail against the gallantry of the British. By a skillful move Moore managed to outflank the left of the French columns sent to crush the infantry under Baird. Centre and left became engaged and a furious fight swept along the line. Hill and valley re-echoed with the din of battle. Moore was in the forefront of the conflict near the village of Elvina, against which the assault was fiercest. Here a cannon shot struck him on the left breast, shattering the shoulder to pieces, breaking the ribs over the heart and tearing the muscles to shreds. Thrown violently from his horse he gave no sign of the terrible nature of his wound, but fixed his gaze steadily on the troops. Only when he saw the thin red line advancing did he suffer himself to be carried to the rear. The hilt of his sword had entered the wound and an officer of his staff would have removed it. "It is as well as it is", said the dying soldier, "I had rather it should go out of the field with me". Moore died as he had always wished to die. "I hope my country will do me justice", were among his last words. And England had reason to be satisfied, for by his skill, his foresight, and his bravery, he saved her army from destruction, and arrested the blow that Napoleon aimed at the conquest of Spain. (extract from British Battles 1898
Very Good. Item #4408

$145.00 USD
$192.84 CAD

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