Red River of the North articles from The Springfield Republican newspaper. The Springfield Republican newspaper.
Red River of the North articles from The Springfield Republican newspaper
Red River of the North articles from The Springfield Republican newspaper
Red River of the North articles from The Springfield Republican newspaper
Red River of the North articles from The Springfield Republican newspaper
Red River of the North articles from The Springfield Republican newspaper
Red River of the North articles from The Springfield Republican newspaper
Red River of the North articles from The Springfield Republican newspaper

Red River of the North articles from The Springfield Republican newspaper

Place Published: Springfield
Publisher: The Springfield Republican
Date Published: 1871
Edition: 1st Edition
Binding: No binding

Original Issue of The Springfield Republican dated August 14, 1871 containing articles on Red River of the North (St. Paul to Winnipeg) written from Winnipeg, Manitoba with the article written on July 31, 1871:

• The Far Northwest Winnipeg, Manitoba; The Red River Region of The North; The River and The Region; The Immensity of The Yet Uninhabited Minnesota and Dakota Praries; The Northern Pacific Railroad; The Red River Trade of The Past, Pembina, Fort Garry and Winnipeg.

Red River of the North is a North American river. Originating at the confluence of the Bois de Sioux and Otter Tail rivers between the U.S. states of Minnesota and North Dakota, it flows northward through the Red River Valley, forming most of the border of Minnesota and North Dakota and continuing into Manitoba. It empties into Lake Winnipeg, whose waters join the Nelson River and ultimately flow into Hudson Bay. The watershed of the Red River was part of Rupert's Land, the concession established by the British Hudson's Bay Company in north central North America. The Red was a key trade route for the company, and contributed to the settlement of British North America. The river was long used by fur traders, including the French and the Métis people, who established a community in this area before the British defeated France in the Seven Years' War. Following that, they took over French territory in Canada. Settlers of the Red River Colony established farming along the river, and their primary settlement developed as Winnipeg, Manitoba. What became known as the Red River Trails, nineteenth-century oxcart trails developed originally by the Métis, supported the fur trade and these settlements. They contributed to further development of the region on both sides of the international border.
Good. Item #2919

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