Report on the UK Abolition of the English Slave Trade from The Connecticut Courant USA Newspaper
Report on the UK Abolition of the English Slave Trade from The Connecticut Courant USA Newspaper
Report on the UK Abolition of the English Slave Trade from The Connecticut Courant USA Newspaper
Report on the UK Abolition of the English Slave Trade from The Connecticut Courant USA Newspaper
Report on the UK Abolition of the English Slave Trade from The Connecticut Courant USA Newspaper
Report on the UK Abolition of the English Slave Trade from The Connecticut Courant USA Newspaper
Report on the UK Abolition of the English Slave Trade from The Connecticut Courant USA Newspaper

Report on the UK Abolition of the English Slave Trade from The Connecticut Courant USA Newspaper

Place Published: Hartford
Publisher: The Connecticut Courant newspaper
Date Published: 1792
Edition: 1st Edition
Binding: No binding

AN EARLY AND IMPORTANT DOCUMENT IN THE HISTORY OF SLAVERY

10 x 16.75 inches, 4pp, The Connecticut Courant, June 18, 1792, Hartford, newspaper. The main article concerns hearings in London England in the House of Commons regarding slavery and the horrors of the Middle Passage.

Paper edge tears plus a 4 inch on left side of fold, otherwise good condition.

William Wilberforce and his battle in the British House of Commons to bring about the change in the law regarding slave trade; Wilberforce again brought the question of abolition before the House and, almost a year after the previous defeat on April 20, 1791), on 2 April 1792, and once more found himself addressing the House of Commons. This speech shows that it was an intense and lengthy emotional harangue. Public feeling was outraged and, on this occasion, so was the feeling of the House. But not quite enough. Henry Dundas suggested an amendment to the Abolition Bill: the introduction of the word 'gradual'. The bill passed as amended, by 230 votes to 85, and gradual abolition became law, the final date for slave trading to remain legal being later fixed at 1796.

The Slave Trade Act was an Act of Parliament of the United Kingdom passed on 25 March 1807, with the long title "An Act for the Abolition of the Slave Trade". The original act is in the Parliamentary Archives. The act abolished the slave trade in the British Empire, but not slavery itself; that remained legal until the Slavery Abolition Act 1833. .

There are also reports on the assassination of the King of Sweden, letters from France, and the major U.S. cities, Philadelphia, New York, and Boston. Besides ads, last page has an interesting article on Absurd Customs. Dr. John Gregory notes that Westerners are horrified at "barbarians" who bind their heads, or feet (Chinese), or distort nose shape. Yet they think nothing of binding young women into stays that restrict breathing and circulation and cause them to faint, or to bind infants into cradles to they don't have to be watched constantly. He notes that among those who wear unrestrictive clothing or none at all: The superior strength, just proportions, and agility of savages are entirely the effects of their hardy education, of their living mostly abroad in the open air, and of their limbs never having suffered any confinement. Interesting, especially given the early date.
Very Good. Item #2862

$400.00 USD
$536.37 CAD

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