War of 1812 Battle Lacolle Mills, Quebec, April 29, 1814 [Boston] Weekly Messenger newspaper. newspaper.
War of 1812 Battle Lacolle Mills, Quebec, April 29, 1814 [Boston] Weekly Messenger newspaper
War of 1812 Battle Lacolle Mills, Quebec, April 29, 1814 [Boston] Weekly Messenger newspaper
War of 1812 Battle Lacolle Mills, Quebec, April 29, 1814 [Boston] Weekly Messenger newspaper

War of 1812 Battle Lacolle Mills, Quebec, April 29, 1814 [Boston] Weekly Messenger newspaper

Place Published: Boston
Publisher: Weekly Messenger
Date Published: 1814
Edition: 1st Edition
Binding: No binding

Original 4pp. newspaper, the [Boston] Weekly Messenger (MA) dated April 29, 1814. Inside page headline and full column detailed eyewitness account of the BATTLE of LACOLLE MILLS (Quebec) during the War of 1812 written by Major General James Wilkinson and dated March 31, 1814. Referred to as the Battle of Oldetown.

Very good condition. The Second Battle of Lacolle Mills in Quebec was fought on 30 March, 1814 during the War of 1812. The small garrison of a British outpost position, aided by reinforcements, fought off a strong but badly-executed American attack. Major General James Wilkinson marched northwards from Plattsburgh to attack this outpost on 27 March, 1814. His force consisted of 4,000 men organised into three brigades, with 11 pieces of artillery. The march was delayed by deep snow and mud, and he was not able to occupy Odelltown until 30 March, and begin the attack on Lacolle Mills until the early afternoon. By evening, the Americans had made little impression on the British defences. Rather than launch an all-out assault, Wilkinson ordered a retreat. Results of the ConflictAmerican troops withdrew the following day. Their casualties were 13 killed, 128 wounded, and 13 missing. The British and Canadians had suffered 11 killed, 44 wounded, and 4 missing. Although the battle was technically a draw, the British held their positions, and General Wilkinson and his army returned to the United States. Major Handcock had successfully blocked the American invasion of Canada with approximately 400 men against an attacking force of 4,000.

General Wilkinson was relieved of duty on April 11. He was later court-martialed but acquitted because he had been acting under the orders of the Secretary of War, John Armstrong.
Very Good. Item #2781

$125.00 USD
$165.62 CAD

See all items by