War of 1812 Battle of the Thames (Tecumseh killed) Nov 5, 1813 [Boston] Weekly Messenger newspaper. newspaper.
War of 1812 Battle of the Thames (Tecumseh killed) Nov 5, 1813 [Boston] Weekly Messenger newspaper
War of 1812 Battle of the Thames (Tecumseh killed) Nov 5, 1813 [Boston] Weekly Messenger newspaper
War of 1812 Battle of the Thames (Tecumseh killed) Nov 5, 1813 [Boston] Weekly Messenger newspaper
War of 1812 Battle of the Thames (Tecumseh killed) Nov 5, 1813 [Boston] Weekly Messenger newspaper
War of 1812 Battle of the Thames (Tecumseh killed) Nov 5, 1813 [Boston] Weekly Messenger newspaper
War of 1812 Battle of the Thames (Tecumseh killed) Nov 5, 1813 [Boston] Weekly Messenger newspaper

War of 1812 Battle of the Thames (Tecumseh killed) Nov 5, 1813 [Boston] Weekly Messenger newspaper

Place Published: Boston
Publisher: Weekly Messenger
Date Published: 1813
Edition: 1st Edition
Binding: No binding

COMPLETE ORIGINAL War of 1812 NEWSPAPER, the Boston Weekly Messenger (MA) dated Nov 5, 1813.

Prominent front page headline: "Official particulars of GENERAL (William Henry) HARRISON'S VICTORY" and four columns of front page detailed reports of the War of 1812 BATTLE of the THAMES (Battle of Moraviantown). Proably the best period newspaper on the Battle of the Thames. The famed Indian Chief TECUMSEH was killed in this battle. This report does not specifically mention the death of TECUMSEH; however, this famous Indian Chief was killed in this battle. There is also a back page, 1/2 column British official report and perspective on the Battle of the Thames dated Montreal Oct.18, 1813.

Plus a 1-1/2 column letter by Com. Chauncy "Chauncey's Running Fight" dated 1st Oct. 1813 detailing the Lake Ontario runing batlle with Sir James Lucas Yeo and the British ships near York (Toronto) and Burlington Bay.

Some water staining and age toning. Good overall condition. Battle of the Thames, also called Battle of Moraviantown (Oct. 5, 1813) in the War of 1812, decisive U.S. victory over British and Indian forces in Ontario, Canada, enabling the United States to consolidate its control over the Northwest. After the U.S. naval triumph in the Battle of Lake Erie in September 1813, the British commander at Detroit, Brigadier General Henry A. Procter, found his position untenable and began a hasty retreat across the Ontario peninsula. He was pursued by about 3,500 U.S. troops under Major General William Henry Harrison, who was supported by the U.S. fleet in command of Lake Erie. The forces met near Moraviantown on the Thames River, a few miles east of what is now Thamesville. The British, with about 600 regulars and 1,000 Indian allies under Tecumseh, the Shawnee intertribal leader, were greatly outnumbered and quickly defeated. Many British troops were captured and Tecumseh was killed, destroying his Indian alliance and breaking the Indian power in the Ohio and Indiana territories. After this battle, most of the tribes abandoned their association with the British.

After destroying Moraviantown, a village of Christian Indians, the U.S. troops returned to Detroit. The U.S. victory helped catapult Harrison into the national limelight and eventually the presidency. Quoted from Encyclopædia Britannica online article.
Good. Item #2711

$175.00 USD
$231.87 CAD

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