Item #1584 The Pictorial Life of Wolfe. A. E. WOLFE-AYLWARD, General James WOLFE, subject.
The Pictorial Life of Wolfe
The Pictorial Life of Wolfe
The Pictorial Life of Wolfe
The Pictorial Life of Wolfe
The Pictorial Life of Wolfe
The Pictorial Life of Wolfe
The Pictorial Life of Wolfe
The Pictorial Life of Wolfe
The Pictorial Life of Wolfe
The Pictorial Life of Wolfe

The Pictorial Life of Wolfe

Place Published: Plymouth
Publisher: William Brendon and Son, Limited, Mayflower Press
Date Published: [1926]
Edition: 1st
Binding: Hard Cover

LIMITED FIRST EDITION IN GOOD CONDITION

First edition. 4to. 8-3/8 x 11-1/8 inches. 6 p. leaves, iv, 212pp; 213 unnumbered. Rebacked with new spine no type, with embossed royal coats of arms crest in gilt to front board. 103 tissue-protected b/w plates. Black and white illustration of Wolfe frontispiece; Foreword by Lieut.-colonel The Earl Stanhope. Internally very clean and very good condition.

Limited Edition of 146 to 250 copies? with subscribers list at end of volume. Foreword dated 1924 and preface dated 1926.

Overall condition, very good.

" General James Wolfe (1727-1759) was a British general, remembered mainly for his role in establishing British rule in Canada. Wolfe was born in Westerham, Kent, England, the son of General Edward Wolfe. From his earliest years he was destined for a military career, entering his father's regiment at the age of 14. Wolfe fought at the Battle of Dettingen in 1743. He served in Scotland under the Duke of Cumberland in the campaign to defeat the Jacobite army of Bonnie Prince Charlie, and took part in the Battle of Culloden in 1746. At the Battle of Culloden he refused to carry out an order of the Duke of Cumberland, to shoot a wounded highlander stating his honour was worth more than his commission. This act may have been a cause for his later popularity among his Royal Highland troops. He returned to Germany and in July 1747 was wounded at the Battle of Lauffeld. Wolfe fought as a colonel under Jeffrey Amherst at the siege of Louisbourg on June 12, 1758, during the French and Indian War. The prime minister, William Pitt, chose him to lead the British assault on Quebec the following year.

The British army laid siege to the city for three months. During that time, Wolfe issued a written document, known as Wolfe's Manifesto, to the French-Canadian civilians, as a part of his strategy of psychological intimidation. In March 1759, prior to arriving at Quebec, Wolfe had written to Amherst: "If, by accident in the river, by the enemy’s resistance, by sickness or slaughter in the army, or, from any other cause, we find that Quebec is not likely to fall into our hands (persevering however to the last moment), I propose to set the town on fire with shells, to destroy the harvest, houses and cattle, both above and below, to send off as many Canadians as possible to Europe and to leave famine and desolation behind me; but we must teach these scoundrels to make war in a more gentleman like manner."

After an extensive yet unsuccessful shelling of the city, Wolfe then led a very bold and risky amphibious landing at the base of the cliffs west of Quebec along the St. Lawrence River. His army with two small cannon, scaled the cliffs early on the morning of September 13, 1759, surprising the French under the command of the Marquis de Montcalm, who thought the cliffs would be unclimbable. The French, faced with the possibility that the British would haul more cannon up the cliffs and knock down the city's remaining walls, fought the British on the Plains of Abraham. The French were defeated, but Wolfe was shot in the chest and died just as the battle was won. Wolfe's victory at Quebec enabled an assault on the French at Montreal the following year. With the fall of Montreal, French rule in North America came to an end." - wiki
Very Good. Item #1584

$35.00 USD
$44.74 CAD