Disbound printed Letter from the Secretary of War, J.C. Calhoun, relating to General Arthur St. Clair. J. C. CALHOUN, General Arthur ST. CLAIR, John Caldwell, subject.
Disbound printed Letter from the Secretary of War, J.C. Calhoun, relating to General Arthur St. Clair
Disbound printed Letter from the Secretary of War, J.C. Calhoun, relating to General Arthur St. Clair
Disbound printed Letter from the Secretary of War, J.C. Calhoun, relating to General Arthur St. Clair

Disbound printed Letter from the Secretary of War, J.C. Calhoun, relating to General Arthur St. Clair

Place Published: Washington
Publisher: printed by e. de Krafft
Date Published: 1818
Edition: 1st
Binding: Disbound

Printed letter from J.C. Calhoun (speaker of the house of Representatives) to the Department of War dated February 6, 1818. on the matters of statements of accounts for General Arthur St. Clair. Folded statement of accounts covering 1792 - 1812 totaling $1,513.72 Letter from Peter Hagner, Auditor Treasury Dept. dated Feb. 6, 1818 confirming accounting records provided.

J.C. Calhoun Arthur St. Clair was the ninth President of the Continental Congress under the Articles of Confederation, a general in the Continental Army during the American Revolutionary War, the highest-ranking officer in the US Army (1791–1792), and the only territorial governor of the Northwest Territory.

Arthur St. Clair saw service in the French and Indian War and served under General Jeffrey Amherst at the capture of Louisburg in 1758. He was promoted to lieutenant the following year and was assigned to the command of General James Wolfe and was present at the Battle of the Plains of Abraham.

With the outbreak of the Revolutionary War, St. Clair supported the patriot cause and served on his county's Committee of Safety. In 1775, Congress appointed St. Clair a colonel in the Continental Army and he participated in the ill fated attack on Canada. During the winter of 1776-1777, he fought at the battles of Trenton and Princeton. In 1777 he rose to brigadier-general and was appointed commander of Fort Ticonderoga. His small garrison was forced to withdraw in July 1777 in the face of overwhelming opposition and made a tactical retreat. In 1778 he was court martialed for the loss of Ticonderoga but was exonerated of any wrong doing and returned to duty. After the war, St. Clair represented Pennsylvania in the Confederation Congress, including a term as president of the Congress from 1787 to 1789. Congress then appointed St. Clair to the governorship of the Northwest Territory.

After the defeat of Josiah Harmar's troops, St. Clair led a punative expedition against Little Turtle in 1791. On the banks of the Wabash River, Little Turtle's warriors attacked St. Clairs army. Untrained militiamen broke and ran. In combat, St. Clair had two horses shot out from under him. He led surviving Americans to fight their way through enemy lines. St. Clair had suffered the worst defeat of American troops at the hands of Indian warriors in history, ending St. Clair's military career. quoted from online Find A Grave web site.


Good. Item #1127

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